How to Build Concrete Driveways In Sections by Yourself - Keeping Things Simple

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  • Published on Jun 5, 2018
  • www.homebuildingandrepairs.com/driveways/index.html Click on this link more information about driveway construction, home remodeling and building repairs. This video will provide you with a few ideas how you can build a concrete driveway in sections alone. I've done it before and I've built a variety of different concrete patios, sidewalks with this method and think it will work well for beginners.
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Comments • 200

  • gregvancom
    gregvancom  Year ago +11

    Here's a video that will provide you with a better idea about how much concrete you might need and how to make it easier by pouring it in smaller sections.
    ru-clip.net/video/tVx-_EnsILY/video.html

    • Studd Muffin
      Studd Muffin 2 months ago

      @Mikhail Blinovskov Once you have done one section and concrete has set up; use that side for your next section/pure. You can create lines by placing thin insulation in between.

    • Mikhail Blinovskov
      Mikhail Blinovskov 10 months ago

      gregvancom how do make those splitting lines? You pour the first block but when you add the next one the line won’t be there, you have to make it somehow. This is the most difficult question for me

  • Swan Hill Pet Boarding Swan Hill Pet Boarding

    Notch out the form for the rebar - what an absolute waste of time. It must be amateur night and the concreters guild!

  • Michael D
    Michael D Month ago +1

    Would this work for a garage slab

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  Month ago +1

      I don't see why it wouldn't, but you might need to check with your local building department or building authorities to verify. The reason reason why I think it wouldn't be a problem would be because I've seen plenty of garage slabs cut into sections with concrete saws as a way of providing control joints.

  • rafiqa 1
    rafiqa 1 Month ago

    diy in sections, certainly makes alot of sence. thank you.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  Month ago

      You're welcome and I'm glad it helped.

  • Pet Mot
    Pet Mot 2 months ago +1

    Great idea to explain the process on diagram / computer ...straight forward.👍

  • Steven Kutsenkow
    Steven Kutsenkow 2 months ago

    What if you are pouring the pads in sections but not at the same time? For example, you are replacing pads in driveway over time or adding an addition to the driveway. Do you recommend using dowels to join all the pads together or do you use expansion joint in-between all of them?

    • Steven Kutsenkow
      Steven Kutsenkow 2 months ago

      @gregvancom thanks for the reply. I've seen some pretty terrible expansion joint materials and then I've also seen some pretty good ones that seem to hold up. It's almost like a rubber material like what they use on a track around a football field.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  2 months ago +1

      I'm not a big fan expansion joint materials, because they can erode and disappear leaving you with a gap in your concrete sidewalks or driveways and of course dowels can prevent one section of the concrete from lifting or sinking as soil settles, so would be a good idea if you have the tools.

  • dillardstreet432
    dillardstreet432 3 months ago +1

    nice

  • Paddy Redman
    Paddy Redman 3 months ago +2

    Great vid, animation and detailed explanation, I'm sure you've saved a lot of people a lot of money. Right on man.
    As a contractor myself, I'm amazed at the amount of contractors out there who insist on mass pouring over sectional pours. The cost in labour and multiple truck deliveries is way more on mass pours over sectional pours and if you use a fibre expansion filler in-between pads, if needed, then theres no need to cut expansion groves, saving more time and labour.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  3 months ago

      It's hard to tell if I've saved them a lot of money or added more frustration to their life, but let's hope that I have. Good point about the control joints.

  • Z Ack
    Z Ack 4 months ago

    Looks good on paper.. did you do a driveway by yourself like that??

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  4 months ago

      It wasn't a driveway, but a patio that had about eight sections to it.

  • Donny Luv
    Donny Luv 4 months ago

    Very informative video. I've laid pads for monument signs so I know what will work, but this just confirmed and showed me some good tips. Thanks much.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  4 months ago

      You're welcome and I'm glad it helped.

  • binthrdonthat
    binthrdonthat 4 months ago

    I love your educational videos and have been watching for some time. We got taken by a group that were suppose to do work in the front yard and talked us into a driveway. Our old driveway was built in 1966 and was divided into fours with 2X4 dividers that were left in place. We had no cracks and some areas poured were 5 inches deep. Anyway they tore up the driveway and got some of the money, more than they should have, put some posts and walkway in and then never came back. We've had a dirt and rock driveway for almost a year. We are in the suburbs so I'm surpise the city hasn't said anything to us yet. Anyway one of my concerns is that our driveway is sloped. How do I maintain that curvature without over or under doing it. I don't want a ski mogul or a ramp. Thanks again Greg

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  4 months ago

      Hope you didn't lose too much money and these contractor scam stories don't seem like they're ever going to stop. Feel free to email me some pictures of your driveway and I'll see if I can come up with anything. You can get our email address at our website.

  • Kevin Reynolds
    Kevin Reynolds 5 months ago

    First, thanks for a great video. Second, I live in Maine, would this be feedable with the winters we have here, or might there be issues due to frost heaves? Everyone here seems to do asphalt. I would love to do this for my new house.
    Thanks

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  4 months ago

      You're welcome and there is actually no way I could guarantee doing something like this without dealing with frost heaves. I would strongly suggest checking with a local concrete contractor in your area for more information.

  • Brian5150
    Brian5150 5 months ago

    Great video, exactly the question I was asking. I understand about the rounded edger to make a nice edge, but when you pour the slab next to the one you previously poured, aren’t you pouring right up against the existing slab? You wouldn’t put a form in between the existing slab and the one you are about to pour would you? That would be 1 1/2 in gap. Won’t the concrete more or less fill the edged gap in?
    Thanks again man. Just got a mixer and I’m gonna concrete the hell out of everything!

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  5 months ago +1

      Someone else already brought that to my attention and I plan on making a video in the future to show everyone how to finish the edge.

  • Dale N
    Dale N 6 months ago

    So Do you use the self leveling crack filler at the control joints to keep water from getting underneath, freezing and causing the concrete to heave in the colder climates?
    Do you use the premix bags of concrete from the store so you're not having to create a measured mix of different materials if trying to create your own batch as you want the strength?
    Also cost wise going with bags vs having a truck come with the cost of bags vs truck balanced against the saved labor is it financially cheaper if you have the time?
    I will need footings, forms 42in deep and 8in thick per code. Also the current exterior driveway a double stall will need replaced.
    On the new garage we'll have to redo the apron for the driveway and city Code don't allow homeowners to Do that part because you're "connecting" to a city street so it has to be a "licensed, bonded and insured" contractor to be able to Do it.
    With the cost of hiring someone I may see what those costs will be to get the license, bond and insurance for a month as it still has to be cheaper than getting a general contractor who's gonna soak you for what they can because of the city rules.
    I know I'd be able to get the amount of people I need for the apron pour and might as well get whatever extra concrete I'll need on the same truck to save me some time in other areas as if I pay 4-5 people $75-90 for 4 hrs work cash I think we'd be able to handle a full truck of concrete if the yardage isn't to high.
    I guess it all depends on how much they can fit in a concrete truck and how many people you need to handle that much concrete at once?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  6 months ago

      I will be glad to answer two questions in time.

      So Do you use the self leveling crack filler at the control joints to keep water from getting underneath, freezing and causing the concrete to heave in the colder climates?

      I would suggest contacting a contractor in your area to see what they're doing. You can always leave gaps about three eights of an inch wide and then fill them with a sealant designed for gaps in concrete.

      Do you use the premix bags of concrete from the store so you're not having to create a measured mix of different materials if trying to create your own batch as you want the strength?

      I've used both, premix bags and separate mixes of sand and gravel, along with cement.

      This would've been the longest group of questions I ever encountered, but right now I'm a little busy and would appreciate no more than two questions in time. Thanks in advance.

  • Teri Orlando
    Teri Orlando 6 months ago

    Thank you!! I'm going to check out your other video on how much I need.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  6 months ago

      You're welcome and good luck on your project.

  • Lou Fazio
    Lou Fazio 7 months ago

    Rounded edges also reduce edge chipping by reducing stress concentration. The saw-cut intersections crack/chip.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  6 months ago +1

      Very good point and from what I've noticed when saw cutting is that if it does chip it usually isn't a very large one. I personally like rounded edges myself, but if I was doing a large concrete driveway, might choose to have it cut later, to save myself all of that finishing if I was pouring it all at once.

  • Lou Fazio
    Lou Fazio 7 months ago

    Might be beneficial in high slope situations.

  • John Romano
    John Romano 7 months ago

    Thank for video. I plan on doing my patio in 5x5 sections. I will be using wire in the slabs and connecting the sections with rebar. My question is on the use of expansion material. Should I use it between the slabs? Or will the rebar keep the slabs from shifting? I am also stamping the concrete and I don’t want to have to look at asphalt expansion joints in between my slabs.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  7 months ago

      I cannot provide you with a yes or no answer on the expansion joint, but it usually isn't that difficult to look around your neighborhood and see what others have done. If your neighbors are using it than I would, if they aren't then maybe you shouldn't.

  • Dallas Beus
    Dallas Beus 8 months ago +4

    I poured a small patio/pad for my shed, 9' x 12' over 10 yrs ago using 3' x 3' squares and it turned out great and is still going strong. I also did a small concrete patio in 3' x 3' squares and left the pressure treated lumber in place and it also worked out really well.

  • quangtran3
    quangtran3 8 months ago +1

    1. Do you need to separate each section with some sort of material to account for expansions and contractions of the concrete? I've seen pressure treated wood being used, but I just wanted to know if this is really necessary.
    2. If you have rebars going through different sections and water or oxygen seeps in and contacts the rebars, in the long term, wouldn't the rebars rust away? Potentially your whole rebar system would be eaten away by rust.
    Thanks for the video.

    • Paul Arrowood
      Paul Arrowood 6 months ago +1

      There are three better options to using bare steel rebar. 1rst is epoxy coated steel rebar. 2nd is fiberglass rod rebar. 3rd is basalt (volcanic rock fiber) rebar. Both fiberglass & basalt are much lighter than steel but equal or exceed the required strength as steel reinforcement. If anybody has interest in these alternatives , there is much info on the internet about all three. @gregvancom

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  8 months ago +1

      I would simply look around your neighborhood and see if they're using any expansion materials for their joints and if so repeat the process when building your driveway. I cannot provide you with a standard answer, because I think different building methods are used around the world. As far as the rebar rusting, you're right if it's exposed to air it can deteriorate over time.

  • Oceano_ Rodriguez
    Oceano_ Rodriguez 8 months ago +27

    I am a contractor. This will not work, because I cannot charge you tons of money and will be out of business, lol. Great video!

    • lee hancock
      lee hancock 2 months ago

      Its a lot of work. Plenty of business 😂

    • scott Houser
      scott Houser 6 months ago

      That's pretty much the professional's response

  • William Storey
    William Storey 8 months ago

    Can u pour a footer for a block wall in sections?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  8 months ago

      I cannot provide you with engineering advice, but think it actually might be better to have control joints in the footings that line up with the control joints in the block wall. I don't know how that would work with the rebar, because the footings might need to actually be separated. Again, I'm just thinking out loud.

  • Construction Cluff
    Construction Cluff 8 months ago +1

    Hey, great video just love it when you search something and someone’s already done it! Are you saying if poured in sections, I would pour right up against the previous slab with no expansion material? Basically, if I understand correctly, I’ll have a cold joint an that becomes my control joint? Do you add any sika to these joints? Just love the idea to pour in sections because troweling a 35’x100’ alone is just insane! Cheers

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  8 months ago +1

      I've had other people ask, whether or not you need expansion material and I would suggest looking around your neighborhood or community to see if they used it along with the conditions of the concrete slabs, to figure out whether or not it was needed and glad you like the video.

  • Mongo M.
    Mongo M. 8 months ago +1

    Looks good on computer but I need to see an actual real life video

  • George Pobedanosets
    George Pobedanosets 8 months ago

    Super!👍🏻 thank you !

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  8 months ago

      You're welcome and thanks for watching.

  • J Sartrean
    J Sartrean 8 months ago

    Question: Do you put anything between the seams where the sections connect? Sometimes I see what looks like a "felt" filler between sidewalk sections.

    • J Sartrean
      J Sartrean 8 months ago

      @gregvancom What is that material usually made of? Thank you very much

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  8 months ago +1

      Yes you can and is called an expansion joint. If I was you, I would look around at other driveways in your area and if they're using expansion joint materials, then there might be a good reason why and you should also, but if they aren't then you might not need to. Expansion joints allow the concrete to move a little easier when expanding.

  • Stockton 711
    Stockton 711 9 months ago

    Greedy and Selfish People don't want you to learn in saving Money ,they want you to be dependent on Them .

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  8 months ago

      You bring up a good point and it applies to a lot of professions. I don't think my dentist has much of an interest in providing me with the best ways to take care of my teeth.

  • rick hilliard
    rick hilliard 9 months ago

    What do you mean by "control joint"?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago +1

      Yes, what Patrick said.

    • Patrick Leabo
      Patrick Leabo 9 months ago +1

      rick hilliard it is meant to control the breaking of the slab which will eventually occur.

  • lostintime86
    lostintime86 9 months ago

    7:00 I just realized that I can rip that board down less the amount I need for the rebar to fit. Then use screws to press them together. No warped board issue to deal with. More cement may come out this way. But does not matter. It won't be seen. The next section will hide it. I may expose only 5" of the rebar. Then weld, or tie, the next piece before when I go to do the next section. I can just see myself or others tripping on the rebar. SAFETY FIRST.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago +1

      Definitely another method that can be used.

  • lostintime86
    lostintime86 9 months ago

    VERY NICE!!

  • Brian Moore
    Brian Moore 9 months ago

    Very well orcastrated video. One question if I may ask. I am about to try my drivway myself. The relif cuts that you mention. Are they cut through full depth of concrete or just an inch or so.

    • Brian Moore
      Brian Moore 9 months ago

      @gregvancom so you have butted strieght up to exsisting concrete then.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago +1

      @Brian Moore I've only used them a couple of times and felt that they weren't necessary, even when I used them.

    • Brian Moore
      Brian Moore 9 months ago

      @gregvancom ok. Thankyou. Also do you recomend a spacer to exsisting garage floor or go right to it.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      I believe they are usually about 1/4 of the depth. For example if you have a 4 inch thick concrete slab then they should be 1 inch deep.

  • sameohshit dc5
    sameohshit dc5 9 months ago

    Can I do sections every other day? And will the color be different?

    • sameohshit dc5
      sameohshit dc5 8 months ago +1

      @gregvancom thank you!

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago +1

      Yes you can pour one once a week if you want. As far as the color, it's all about mixing the same amounts of materials and using the same products. Purchase the same bags of cement and even sand and gravel from the same place if possible.

  • Scorp
    Scorp 9 months ago +2

    that is exactly how we do it. plus we also use metal twine like wire to tighten up the cross overs [so the rebar does not move] .
    awesome video !!

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      Thanks for sharing, watching and commenting.

  • Cliff Mennenger
    Cliff Mennenger 9 months ago +1

    Great video. I've done pours like this myself.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      Definitely a good way to build things out a concrete and thanks for the kind words.

  • Lteo Hrnt
    Lteo Hrnt 9 months ago +1

    awesome THANKS

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      Glad you liked it and you're welcome.

  • jose maravilla
    jose maravilla 9 months ago

    THANK YOU SIR.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      You are more than welcome and thanks for watching our videos.

  • Peter Samuel
    Peter Samuel 9 months ago +1

    one of the best videos, my question how to create a slope for example on a patio back yard with sections thanks

    • Z Ack
      Z Ack 4 months ago

      Watched a video of a guy who did a trick with the string you use to initially lay out your outline...

    • Cliff Mennenger
      Cliff Mennenger 9 months ago +1

      A very typical drop of 1/4" per foot. That will shed water fine.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      You would need to build the forms accordingly. Instead of the forms being level, make sure that they are sloping. Let me know if you need more information or if you're having a difficult time figuring out how to install forms so that they are draining water away from your building.

  • Long Dark Night
    Long Dark Night 9 months ago

    Enjoyed this video. I've been pouring since 1979 and my biggest pour ever was an 1100 cubic yard monolithic pour; I had 20 finishers, we started out under lights and finished off under lights. Here in California I've been making segmented pours like this for years, but when I started doing it I was a 'little guy' and had to do this because I lacked the money to hire the crew. Thank you for making this video to help out people. You shouldn't have to go broke if you're a homeowner just wanting to pour a small slab or a driveway now and then. I respect it immensely that you're trying to help people.

    • John Craig
      John Craig 9 months ago +1

      Awesome thanks

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      Thanks for the kind comment. I worked on a project that had about 20 trucks or around 200 yards one time, but 1100, that's nuts.

  • Lakario Davis
    Lakario Davis 9 months ago

    This is awesome info man thanks so much!

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      You are welcome thanks for the enthusiastic comment.

  • GRIFFIN
    GRIFFIN 9 months ago +2

    rub it easy make it hard

  • jeremy baumgart
    jeremy baumgart 9 months ago +1

    Greg,
    Why wouldn't the interconnected rebar between adjacent poured pads negate the effectiveness of the expansion joints? Before seeing this, I would have assumed that each pad would have it's own independent rebar reinforcement.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      @jeremy baumgart I don't know if any sense, but all footings need to be poured below the frost lines in the area, to prevent them from lifting. Let me know if this makes sense and I am going to put your suggestion on my list of videos to be made in the future.

    • jeremy baumgart
      jeremy baumgart 9 months ago +1

      @gregvancom I see what you mean Greg. I like your videos btw. On the subject of preventing slabs shifting around, in places where tree roots are not an issue, I know of one contractor where i live (where ground freezes over a foot deep at times) who dug down and poured 4 concrete piers below the grade where his adjacent pads are going to be poured, this way when the pads lift and shift around in a freeze, they will be able to drop back to plumb once the ground thawes out again. I really liked the sound of the idea and wondered how common this process is. I would guess they leave the top of the pier just slightly above the height of the top of the gravel bed that's going to be the base for the concrete pad, then they pour the concrete pad on top of that after the piers cure. I didnt see it done myself but it seemed like a decent idea. I was thinking they could just embedd a short stainless steel bar so that it sticks up a couple inches out of the top of the pier when its cured, that way the slab has something to ride on and keep it directly in line with its pier base. The process must also involve placing a membrane (like paper or something else dissolvable) over piers before the pad is poured over them so that they will not interonnect. It would be cool if you created an illustration of this process (if you approve of the idea).

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      I understand exactly what you're referring to and if you wanted to keep them separate, then go for it, but the rebar connecting the slabs together will also prevent it one section from raising or lowering due to soil erosion, settlement or tree roots. Let me know if that makes sense.

  • Tributary House Ltd.
    Tributary House Ltd. 9 months ago +2

    What the damn! Or rather what the DAM - next time some concreteo says you can't do it, ask 'eem how they did the Hoover Dam!
    heheheh
    Neat - need to make a slab atop a meano dirt road - no trucks! Some box hoppers above a mixer, same dry measures every time = SHOP FLOOR!!

  • sgabraki23
    sgabraki23 10 months ago

    Pouring concrete with a computer mouse is a little than actually doing it in real life haha... but good tips brother

  • check ya chin
    check ya chin 10 months ago

    Cant afford the taxes after is my problem.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      @GunsAndPoker In a way yes, but I think what they are referring to is that almost any improvement made to your property can increase its value and this would raise property taxes. It's really something few people understand, but again it's another one of those lessons you learn in life after you have made the improvements and you see your property taxes getting raised.

    • check ya chin
      check ya chin 9 months ago

      @GunsAndPoker yeah, it's considered permanent then. Tax the shit out of you for that

    • GunsAndPoker
      GunsAndPoker 9 months ago

      check ya chin
      You mean property taxes going up after finishing the driveway with concrete?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  9 months ago

      I hear you there.

  • Mikhail Blinovskov
    Mikhail Blinovskov 10 months ago

    Do you know how to make those splitting lines between the blocks after you add the second one? Cause you don’t put lumber in there.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  10 months ago +1

      I would use an edge trowel. They come in a variety of different sizes and shapes and can usually be found at your local home improvement centers or hardware stores.

  • nonya buisness
    nonya buisness 10 months ago

    Leave concrete to the pros. Period.

    • Ted Sell
      Ted Sell 10 months ago +2

      nonya buisness yes lol the " pros " I hired were brain dead jackasses good thing I took off work to watch them !

  • jh h
    jh h 10 months ago +3

    Just answered the question ive been asking for years

  • D. Kaiser
    D. Kaiser 10 months ago +2

    Wow! I've been mulling this one over for about 24 hours now because I have a mixer, can't afford to pay for a truck (especially since I would have to pay extra for rural delivery), and I need some slabs. You just saved me thousands! Thank you!

    • D. Kaiser
      D. Kaiser 10 months ago

      @gregvancom I'm struggling with the design of my current project that I need to finish before I get shoulder surgery. The southwest wall of my house needs an awning or our AZ house will be cooking this summer. I can't attach the awning to the house unless I want to pull permits. It's going to be a steel awning built over an existing wood deck. Eventually I want the deck to be a part of the awning, but I can't afford (both time-wise and financially) to do it all in one shot, especially since the deck is going to be expanded. Do you have any ideas on how to build a steel awning over an existing deck and then connecting the two or should I just leave them separate? If you're too busy to deal with this ridiculous question, I understand. Haha.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  10 months ago

      You're welcome and glad I could help.

  • StephenNu9
    StephenNu9 10 months ago

    Very good. Showing the rebar passing through the notches of the wood was a useful insight.

  • Charlie Harrison
    Charlie Harrison 10 months ago

    Thank you I was wandering what was the best way to form the wood and cut notches

  • laughterofelijah
    laughterofelijah 10 months ago

    This is exactly what I was hoping to find! I've been trying to work out how to pour my own patio without tearing up our yard with heavy equipment. Thanks for the thorough walk-through and diagram.

    • Jonathon Klinginsmith
      Jonathon Klinginsmith 18 days ago

      Did you end up pouring your patio? How did the process turn out?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  10 months ago

      You are welcome and glad it helped.

  • R H
    R H 11 months ago

    Hi... Great Video. I am going do a concrete patio slab this spring that will be going up against the foundation of my house. I am planning on doing the wheelbarrow method and also in sections as I will be doing it by myself and am a concrete newbie... Do I need to put anything between the slab and the house foundation? Like a spacer to help if the slab were to expand? If so, what would you recommend? I want to make sure the foundation doesn't get damaged. Thanks for your time.

    • speedwayman100
      speedwayman100 10 months ago

      they have felt you can put between it

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  11 months ago

      I don't think it would be a problem to pour right up against the building foundation, but you can install what is called a "concrete expansion joint" in between them if needed. You could always contact a local concrete contractor and asked them for their opinion also. I would love to be able to answer your question, but the answer to your question depends upon what type of climate you live in and a variety of other factors that local contractors will be aware of.

  • Scott _____
    Scott _____ 11 months ago

    what if you were using a concrete truck but it's your first time ever?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  11 months ago

      If you don't know anything about finishing concrete, then it wouldn't be a bad idea to hire someone to help, but if you think you have enough information and are willing to give it a shot anyway, then it wouldn't be a bad idea to have at least two or three more people there who can help you place the concrete where it needs to go and level it off.

  • Scott _____
    Scott _____ 11 months ago

    what if I have an existing driveway that needs some repair and then I want to add on another driveway, making it a double driveway... side by side.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  11 months ago

      I think I would make driveways the repairs first on the other driveway, but think that you could use these methods to add onto an existing driveways in either direction.

  • Jonathan Lee
    Jonathan Lee 11 months ago

    Really good video. Thanks.Two questions 1) Could you tell what you use to notch the form boards and 2) You mentioned not needing to cut expansion joints - is that because the form itself creates a joint that cuts the entire depth of the pour? From the video, it looks like every form after the first one is three-sided so a joint would still need to be cut. Thanks.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  11 months ago

      @Jonathan Lee Hopefully I understood your question correctly. You shouldn't be installing wood in between the slabs of concrete, unless you're looking for that type of pattern.

    • Jonathan Lee
      Jonathan Lee 11 months ago

      Thanks for the reoly So it's just a smarter of notching between the previously poured and new concrete?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  11 months ago +1

      You could simply cut the notch out with a circular saw. I usually cut two lines and then take a hammer and break the small section where the rebar will be going. If you use a trowel that will create a rounded edge, then you should have some nice looking control joints. Yes, the control joints are created when you pour each concrete slab next to each other.

  • Gene Mean
    Gene Mean 11 months ago

    Is this theoretical or from real experience?

    • caasinauj
      caasinauj Month ago

      I've done it for a patio too. Concrete still standing and looking good after more than 10 years. I also did it this way for a couple of circular planter walls too. About 1-1.5 ft tall and 3.5 ft radius. they look nice but these are only about 6 mo old.

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  11 months ago +1

      I thought I answered this question in the video, but yes I have done it myself before and had excellent results, but in no way would I ever suggest that someone else would, because of my experience or someone else's lack of experience. Hope that makes sense.

  • Joe Stakes
    Joe Stakes Year ago +1

    How do you set the slope/grade for drainage?

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  Year ago +2

      I don't have a video on that, but put it on my list of videos to be made in the future.

  • Rachael D'Auteuil

    Thanks Greg! Love the animation, Great video!! Easy to understand and extremely helpful. Two thumbs up.
    Thanks again :)

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  Year ago

      You're very welcome and I always enjoy hearing comments like yours.

  • RigginTheRod010
    RigginTheRod010 Year ago

    I'm buying a house with a long driveway and I'm trying to figure out how to do the job by myself or with a friend.... Doing it in small sections sounds much better than doing it in larger sections

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  Year ago +1

      @RigginTheRod010 You'll be helping out the economy.

    • RigginTheRod010
      RigginTheRod010 Year ago

      @gregvancom you're right. I'll just have to break down and pay some people

    • gregvancom
      gregvancom  Year ago +1

      Yes, it needs to be manageable. Concrete is often unforgiving and when it starts drying a little faster than expected and you don't have enough concrete finishers on the property, you're going to be in trouble.

  • Charles Ratkie
    Charles Ratkie Year ago

    Awesome thanks for the really helpful tips!